Colloquium Series



Marguerite Callahan, Lockheed Martin

Thursday March 30, 2017 (11:00 - 12:00)

The Software Development Process

Biography: With over 25 years in the IT industry, Marguerite has been at Lockheed Martin for 18 years and has been involved in many development efforts with increasing responsibilitv. Her current role as Lean-Agile Coach helps Lockheed Martin tackle the large software development projects in the age of technical accelerations, where everything is changing so you must allow for flexibility in the software development process but still meet all requirements.

Dr. Jie Wu, Associate Vice Provost, Chair and Laura H. Carnell Professor, IEEE Fellow, Temple University

Thursday February 23, 2017 (11:00 - 12:00)

Algorithmic Crowdsourcing and Applications in Big Data

Abstract: This talk gives a survey of crowdsourcing applications, with a focus on algorithmic solutions. The recent search for Malaysia flight 370 is used first as a motivational example. Fundamental issues in crowdsourcing, in particular, incentive mechanisms for paid crowdsourcing, and algorithms and theory for crowdsourced problem-solving, are then reviewed. Several applications of algorithmic crowdsourcing applications are discussed in detail, with a focus on big data. The talk also discusses several on-going projects on crowdsourcing at Temple University.

Dr. Wei Chang, Assistant Professor of Computer Science, SJU

Thursday November 3, 2016 (11:00 - 12:00)

The Sybil Attack and Its Prevention Techniques

Abstract: We are entering a distributed computing era, where various decisions are individually made at each entity based on the pervasive data from the other entities scattered all over the world. However, most distributed systems are vulnerable to Sybil attacks: by creating a large number of fake identities, an adversary can introduce a considerable amount of false opinions into a distributed system and subvert it. As a result, some entities may make unfair, or even false, decisions. For instance, in some distributed systems, critical resources are assigned based on voting results. If an adversary holds a considerable number of fake identities, he can easily change the overall decision, and unfairly gain more resources. It has been more than a decade since the first appearance of the Sybil attack. In this presentation, Dr. Chang will systematically show the evolution of the Sybil attack and its defense techniques.

Glenn Brunette, Oracle Corporation

Thursday October 20, 2016 (11:00 - 12:00)

The Internet of Things: The Gift of Fire Or a Modern Pandora’s Box?

Abstract: Technology has been woven into nearly every facet of our daily lives. With each passing year, the boundary between the physical world and cyberspace has continued to fade as everyday items have been infused with logic, power, and connectivity. Dubbed the “Internet of Things”, these devices have heralded a new age of innovation and capability, greatly expanding the “art of the possible”. Unfortunately, the capabilities enabled by these technologies are not always positive, expected, or welcome. In this presentation, the benefits and risks of the “Internet of Things” will be discussed. Specific examples will highlight technological challenges, as well as risks to security and privacy. Lastly, recommendations will be offered that illustrate ways in which we can learn from past mistakes.



Saint Joseph's University, 5600 City Avenue, Philadelphia, PA 19131